The Backstory of the Merode Altarpiece Robert Campin

The Merode Altarpiece by Robert Campin is an annunciation triptych full of symbolic meaning that was intended to lead the faithful into deep contemplation of the mysteries of Christ leaving heaven to become a man. In this post we will be exploring the backstory and context of the work. If you wish to read more […]

Saint Jerome in His Study by Albrecht Dürer

I also have the analysis of Albrecht Dürer‘s engraving, Saint Jerome in His Study, at the end of this post in a video format. If you prefer videos be sure to check out and subscribe to my You Tube Channel. Dürer is often referred to as the DaVinci of the North, a true Renaissance man […]

Meet Genda, The Rhinoceros Behind Durer’s Famous Print.

In 1515 an Indian rhinoceros was gifted by Sultan Muzafar II of Gujarat to the governor of Portuguese India. Genda, the rhino, had been living in captivity for some time before she began her world travels. Small zoos, called menageries, which housed exotic animals were popular with nobility, and gifting a magnificent animal was a […]

Bruegel Resists, A Painting With Many Stories to Tell.

Pieter Bruegel the Elder was a Flemish Northern Renaissance painter  who lived from 1525 to 1569, dying when he was 44. Of his children, two sons also became famous painters. Bruegel was known for his landscapes and genre paintings. In fact, he was a pioneer in genre painting, or painting the common people. He used […]

Pieter Bruegel the Elder The Census at Bethlehem

Welcome to Day 21 I love this painting. I’ve been running short on time, and hope to come back to this soon to add some more photos and clean up the post a bit, but I’m on a deadline. There are just so many engaging pieces to this painting, that I’m going to have to […]

Matthias Grunwald, The Annunciation from the Isenheim Altarpiece

Welcome to day 18. Matthias Grunewald was a contemporary of Albrecht Durer. Both men were important Northern Renaissance painters, both became embroiled in the turbulent politics and religious conflicts that dominated the era, and both expressed themselves in unique and arresting ways. Some of Grunewald’s paintings had originally been attributed to Durer, what is odd […]

The Portinari Altarpiece by Hugo Van Der Goes

Welcome to day 13. Hugo Van Der Goes is recognized as one of the most original and bold of the Netherlandish painters. Born in or around Ghent, he spent most of his artistic life there. He completed altarpieces, portraits, court commissions and civic projects.  Few of his original works have survived, however we have many […]

Jan Van Eyck’s The Annunciation, The Hidden Meanings.

Welcome to day 11. for he has looked on the humble estate of his servant.     For behold, from now on all generations will call me blessed      Luke 1 It has been said that the Flemish wish is to paint more than the eye can see, and almost more than the mind can comprehend. This statement […]

Roger Van Der Weyden’s The Visitation

Welcome to Day 10. We return to the North to look at the work of a student of Robert Campin (we covered Campin on Day 8). We will be focusing on The Visitation, a small panel painting, and then taking a quicker look at The Nativity, where another version of The Visitation is painted. First, a […]